Tamil Nadu encourages technical textiles production

Tamil Nadu encourages technical textiles production

The Department of Textiles and Handlooms is also exploring ways to finance technical textile research and development conducted independently by academic institutions and through industry-academia partnerships.

The Tamil Nadu Government is considering the adoption of a procurement policy to acquire its technical textile needs from local industries.

Dharmendra Pratap Yadav, Secretary of the Department of Handlooms, Handicrafts, Textiles, and Khadi, stated that the state’s textile strategy is likely to incorporate the procurement policy. He mentioned that a portion of the technical textile items produced in the state could be either brand-new or replacements for items currently utilised by the State Government departments.

The Department of Textiles and Handlooms is also exploring ways to finance technical textile research and development conducted independently by academic institutions and through industry-academia partnerships.

According to M Vallalar, Textiles Commissioner, Tamil Nadu, technical textiles should be manufactured by textile businesses in Coimbatore and Tiruppur specialising in cotton-based goods.

K Vivekanandan, Commissioner of Handlooms, believes that the state’s goal of achieving a $ 1 trillion economy should also have positive effects on the textile and handloom industries. Currently, the department is actively involved with institutions offering engineering or textile technology courses to facilitate the industry’s expansion.

Vallalar predicts that when Tamil Nadu companies commence the production of technical textiles, they will surpass states like Maharashtra and Gujarat. Arindam Basu, Director General, Northern India Textile Research Association, supports this claim.

Basu stated that in India, the utilisation of technical textiles is 20 per cent, whereas in affluent nations, it varies from 30 per cent to 60 per cent. Additionally, he noted that India’s technological textile industry is growing at a rate of 10 per cent annually, in contrast to the country’s conventional textile industry, which is growing at 4 per cent annually. Therefore, he believes that it presents significant opportunities.

Despite Maharashtra and Gujarat currently leading the way, Prakash Vasudevan, Director, South India Textile Research Association, anticipates that Tamil Nadu will soon witness a surge in the production of technical textile products.

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